One of the most famous of all Thai foods, and what I think is one the best soups in the world, is Thai tom yum goong (ต้มยำกุ้ง).

What I love most about tom yum goong (ต้มยำกุ้ง) is the flavors of lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, fresh Thai chilies, and fresh lime juice, that all combine to create a healthy and soothing broth that will light up your taste buds.

If you’re looking to cook an awesome and authentic soup, try this tom yum soup recipe.

This recipe is for local Thai street food style tom yum soup – it’s not the fancy kind – but follow this recipe for the authentic taste you’ll find in Thailand.

Exclusive Bonus: Download a Free PDF version of this recipe. It’s convenient to read and print. Enjoy!

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evaporated milk Thailand
Evaporated milk – the secret that makes it creamy

The Two Version of Tom Yum Soup

If you love to eat tom yum soup (ต้มยำ), you might already know about two main distinct variations of the dish.

Tom yum goong nam sai (ต้มยำกุ้งน้ำใส) is tom yum with shrimp in a clear broth, while tom yum goong nam khon (ต้มยำกุ้งน้ำข้น) is the creamy milky version.

Contrary that many people think tom yum is made creamy with coconut milk, it’s actually nom kream tiam (นมครีมเทียม), which is canned evaporated milk (as opposed to sweetened condensed milk).

Note: If you’re looking for a Thai coconut milk based soup, check out my tom kha gai recipe.

In this tom yum recipe, I’ll be showing you how to make both versions, depending on which style you prefer (they are both common in Thailand).

tom yum shrimp recipe
I used goong mae nam (กุ้งแม่น้ำ), or freshwater shrimp

Goong (กุ้ง), or shrimp is one of the most popular things to make this soup with, but you can also choose to make tom yum with a mix of seafood like squid, or with chicken, or fish (one of my favorite versions too).

When I went to the market before making this recipe, there was a nice supply of goong mae nam (กุ้งแม่น้ำ), or freshwater shrimp, so I had to go for them. But you can really use any kind of shrimp or other meat of your choice.

Thai ingredients for tom yum
Main vegetables to use in this recipe

Essential Tom Yum Soup Ingredients:

The most absolutely essential ingredients for this tom yum recipe are the trio of Thai herbs:

This trio of Thai ingredients is what really gives tom yum its flavor, and without them you would not have a complete dish.

Other ingredients are still important though, especially Thai chilies (พริกขี้หนู), mushrooms (เห็ด), cilantro (ผักชี), tomatoes (มะเขือเทศ), sweet white onions (หอมใหญ่), lime juice (มะนาว), sugar (น้ำตาล), and fish sauce (น้ำปลา).

Full list of ingredients listed in the official recipe section below.

nam prik pao (น้ำพริกเผา)
Popular brand of nam prik pao (น้ำพริกเผา) in Thailand

I like to use something called nam prik pao (น้ำพริกเผา) in my recipe for tom yum, and it’s especially necessary if you make the creamy version.

Nam prik pao (น้ำพริกเผา) is basically a Thai roasted chili sauce that’s packed with flavor and usually bought in a can these days.

Ok, so let’s move on to the full recipe now.

Thai tom yum soup recipe
Thai tom yum recipe

But first, watch the video for exact detailed instructions:

(If you can’t see the video, watch it here: http://youtu.be/lCmAvdvRC3U)

Thai tom yum soup recipe (ต้มยำกุ้ง)

Time: About 30 minutes
Recipe size: 1 pot of soup, probably about 5 – 6 bowls
Utensils: Large saucepan
Flavors: Salty and sour, amazing soup
Eat it with: Rice, and a spread of other Thai dishes

4.8 from 32 reviews
Authentic Tom Yum Recipe (ต้มยำกุ้ง) with Shrimp
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Tom Yum Goong (ต้มยำกุ้ง) soup is one of the most well known dishes in Thai cuisine, and in this recipes you'll learn to make the authentic Thai street food style version. There are 2 different types of tom yum, the clear version and the creamy version, and there's directions on how to make both types. Enjoy this recipe for tom yum. Be sure to watch the video here.
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Thai
Serves: 3 - 5
Ingredients
  • 2 liters of water
  • 4 stalks of lemongrass
  • 1 inch chunk of galangal
  • 10 kaffir lime leaves
  • 10 Thai chilies
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • ½ kilo shrimp
  • 300 grams of oyster mushrooms
  • 2 roma tomatoes
  • 2 white onions (medium sized)
  • 2 teaspoons of sugar
  • 8 - 12 tablespoons of fish sauce (depending on your taste)
  • 8 - 12 tablespoons of lime juice (10 - 15 limes)
  • Handful of cilantro
Creamy tom yum version
  • 3 tablespoons canned Thai roasted chili sauce (nam prik pao น้ำพริกเผา)
  • 10 tablespoons evaporated milk
  • Taste test, you may need to add more lime juice or fish sauce as the milk and roasted chili sauce throws off the sourness and saltiness.
Instructions
  1. First thing to do is put about 2 liters of water in a pot to boil.
  2. Then I like to start by squeezing my limes. This is not the first step of the recipe, but it’s best to have your limes squeezed so when you need them later, you don’t need to rush to squeeze them all. Slice about 10 limes and juice them all into a small bowl, and set them aside for later.
  3. Take your stalks of lemongrass, and first tear off the outermost leaf and throw it out. Then, I like to use a mallet to lightly pound the lemongrass to release the flavors. Then just slice it diagonally into 1 inch strips or so.
  4. Take about 1 thumb sized chunk of the root part of galangal, and chop it into slices.
  5. Coarsely break about 10 kaffir lime leaves - no need to cut them, just tear them - which is going to help release their flavor.
  6. Peel about 5 cloves of garlic.
  7. I used about 10 Thai bird chilies (prik kee noo) for this recipe, but you can use however many you’d like. First, take off the stem, and then you can either just slice them in two pieces, or give them a little pound on your cutting board like I did (just be careful of flying seeds). You can also remove the seeds if you’d still like the chili flavor but not as much heat.
  8. Throw the lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, garlic and chilies into the water. You can put on the lid just so it starts to boil and release all the herb flavors quicker.
  9. Now prepare your shrimp (or whatever meat of choice you’re making tom yum with). Since I used goong mae nam (กุ้งแม่น้ำ), freshwater shrimp, I first chopped off all the tentacles.
  10. Boil your soup with all the herbs in it for about 10 minutes, and you can go ahead and toss in the shrimp and turn the fire to low.
  11. Then add your mushrooms, which you should pre rinse beforehand.
  12. Take two roma tomatoes and two small white onions and slice them into wedges - you want them to be big and chunky. Then go ahead and add them to the tom yum.
  13. If you’re using shrimp for this tom yum recipe, you might get some foam build up on top of your soup, in which case you can just lightly skim it off the top and toss it out.
  14. Boil the tom yum for about 2 - 3 minutes.
  15. Next, add about 6 tablespoons of fish sauce first, and 2 teaspoons of sugar. You may need more of each, but start with that.
  16. Boil your tom yum for another minute or so and then turn off the heat. You don’t want your tom yum to be overcooked. The mushrooms and onions should be soft, and then it’s ready.
  17. Once your heat is off, go back to your lime juice and add about 8 tablespoons of lime juice (depending on how sour you like it, I like it really sour).
  18. Make sure you taste test until your tom yum is perfectly sour and salty. You might need to add more fish sauce, sugar, or lime juice.
  19. Finally chop up a handful of fresh cilantro, throw it in the soup, and give your tom yum a final stir. The lime juice and cilantro taste fresher and more vibrant when not boiled, so that’s why I turn off the heat before adding them.
  20. You now have Tom yum goong nam sai (ต้มยำกุ้งน้ำใส), the clear version of tom yum.
For the creamy version of Tom Yum
  1. For this recipe, I took out about ½ of the tom yum and set it aside as the clear version, and then made the other ½ as the creamy version.
  2. Turn your heat back on low.
  3. Add about 3 heaping tablespoons of Thai roasted chili sauce (nam prik pao น้ำพริกเผา) to your soup and stir it in.
  4. Also about 10 tablespoons of evaporated milk.
  5. Mix it all in and let your soup heat up for about 1 minute.
  6. At this stage, you’ll need to taste test and evaluate. The roasted chili sauce and creaminess from the evaporated milk will alter the flavors from the clear version, so you might need more lime juice and more fish sauce. Just keep taste testing until it’s exactly how you like it.
  7. And there you have the creamy version of tom yum.
Notes
Tom Yum Goong (ต้มยำกุ้ง) is a Thai soup that's meant to be eaten with a variety of other Thai dishes. It's not normally eaten as an individual bowl of soup, the way it would be in Western cultures, but instead it's a communal dish that goes together with other dishes and eaten with rice. See more of our authentic Thai recipes here.

For myself, I like both versions of tom yum, and it sort of depends on which mood I’m in.

Overall, 75% of the time I like tom yum goong nam sai (ต้มยำกุ้งน้ำใส clear version) because it’s so pure and clear and tastes quite healthy. Also, the flavors of sourness and the the heat from the chilies are usually a little more pronounced in this version.

Tom yum goong nam khon (ต้มยำกุ้งน้ำข้น creamy version), can be excellent as well.

It’s richer and creamier, and usually a little sweeter, and like I mentioned, the creaminess usually tones down the chili heat and sourness a bit.

Authentic Tom Yum Recipe
Thai tom yum soup recipe

I hope you enjoyed this tom yum soup recipe. Be sure to give it a try when you have a chance, and let me know what you think.

Do you like your tom yum clear or creamy?

Also, be sure to check out my of my authentic Thai recipes here.

Free Bonus: Click the button below to download a PDF copy of this tom yum soup recipe (for FREE). It’s convenient to read and print.

Send it to me!



232 comments. I'd love to hear from you!

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  • Alexander

    2 weeks ago

    Dear Mark,
    the recipe and the taste is beyond all criticism, but how is your opinion about the shrimp production in Asia and Thailand? If I buy a shrimp dish in Bangkok what quality can I expect? Once I bought frozen shrimps from Thailand. I got the runs from the antibiotics in it. I tested it sveral times.

  • TAIRA AHNAD

    2 months ago

    i tried your TOM YUM SOUP the clear one and The creamy one too , MY BOYS AND their families went crazy and want me to start cooking for them again !!

  • Wojtek

    3 months ago

    Dear Mark,
    Thanks a lot for all the stuff you post, this website is my go-to for thai food, and I like the way you put up recipes, with some more description and stuff, awesome work, keep it up!
    The only suggestion I have would be to use scales and units more. Your recipes always turned out good when I made them but sometimes somethings were off, especially long it took me to figure out the coconut milk amount/water solution, but that is largely a matter of different brands available around the world. However I figure it would be more clear if you gave (at least estimated) mass of what you use. Take this recipe for example. It said “8 – 12 tablespoons of lime juice (10 – 15 limes)”.
    I really don’t know, are my spoons really small or my limes really big, but from what you said you squeeze almost one tablespoon lime juice from a single lime. (?!?!?) I get at least 3 out of one… I do realize cooking is not chemistry, and you can’t really just list how many grams of what to add and voila, but sometimes it would be helpful to know if we are at the same page with stuff…

    Thanks once again, keep up the good work and take care!

  • Shaukat

    3 months ago

    Mark, this is one of my most fave Thai soups.
    The only problem is, where I live, we don’t get kaffir lime leaves or nam prik pao.
    So what alternative you could suggest for these 2 ingredients?

  • Laura

    3 months ago

    I made the creamy version of this soup but with chicken and WOW!!! It was lovely!!
    Definitely one of my favorites.

  • tellier

    3 months ago

    j’adore ce site, je voyage tous les ans en thailande et je raffole la cuisine thaie. sur ce site les recettes sont authentiques et bien expliquées

  • Ed

    3 months ago

    In the recipie you mentioned that you saved half for clear and half for creamy . Just to confirm if I want to make the entire recipie creamy I should double the paste and milk in the ingridients list correct ?

  • Kay

    3 months ago

    Hi. Love the sound of this recipe. Do you skice the garlic?

  • Momoko

    4 months ago

    I made the clear version and its awesome!!!!
    Thank you Mark.. arigatou from Tokyo

  • Momoko

    4 months ago

    I love Thai food but was afraid to cook as it seems complicated. But you made it very easy and now I enjoy making it. Thank you very much
    Can I ask a question? Is there another version with chili paste but no milk?

    • Mark Wiens

      3 months ago

      Hi Momoko, thank you very much. Usually the traditional version would be made with just the shrimp tomalley, and then fresh chilies. But I’m not sure of another with a different type of chili paste.

  • Rosalind Arokiaswami

    4 months ago

    good

  • cheryl pane

    4 months ago

    Making this soup to your own taste with spicy sour salty including all of the ingredients, is the best way for each person to enjoy it?? And having extra spice sour salty on the side is an easy way for each person to season their own bowl of soup… Do you agree?? I personally love it with coconut cream…and extra coriander and spring onions..

  • Jim

    4 months ago

    It’s hard for me to tell whether the soup needs more fish sauce or sugar, as I don’t cook with them very often. Can you share some tips on how the soup would taste if it needed either?

  • Phil Vermaak

    4 months ago

    Really AWESOME. Am learning something new every day. Love your presentations, as they are to the point and easy to follow. Every time I cook your recipes I get an 11 out of 10. If not, they dont get invited back. Jokes aside, they love your meals.

  • Kelsea

    4 months ago

    I am SO EXCITED!! I used to have a little place I went to in my hometown for Tom Yum when I was feeling under the weather or downright sick. Now that I’ve moved, nowhere seems to make it quite the same. This recipe is IT, though!! I’m making it a second time for my little sick guy, so I definitely added less spice, but he loves it, too. Definitely going to be a staple in our house. Thank you so much for the recipe AND the amazing details!!

  • Troy

    4 months ago

    Mark,
    You have a wonderful collection of recipes. They all look great. I’m getting my ingredients ready to start making your yummy dishes. I could only find dried galangal and having a hard time finding lemon grass, I haven’t been able to find the kaffir lime leaves either. I live in Florida. I did find a lemon grass paste, don’t know how well this would work??
    You have the best descriptions of your recipes and your videos are really informative.
    P.S. I saw you video with Andrew Zimmern, very cool. I love his show.

    Cheers,
    Troy

  • Noraisah

    4 months ago

    I have made this twice and its so delicious, thank you so much.

  • Brian

    4 months ago

    Awesome! Eating this right now. Thank you!

  • Marcelino

    4 months ago

    Hola Marc. Saludos desde Barcelona.
    Sensacional tu trabajo culinario e informativo de tus viajes. Soy un amante de la comida thai. Probe el Tom Yum cremoso y me salio de maravilla.
    Tengo un problema quiero cocinar FIDEOS CON CANGREJO O CON GAMBAS pero no me sale del todo bien. Puedes ayudarme?
    Un abrazo desde Barcelona.

  • Patti

    5 months ago

    My favorite! Thank you so much for going beyond the foods and cities, and providing recipes! Much appreciated, as I love asian food of all kinds.

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Hi Patti, you’re welcome, thanks for your support.

  • Fred

    5 months ago

    The fish sauce has 1250 grams of salt per tablespoon,
    As a senior ,its way above my daily salt recomendation,
    Can I use anchovy paste instead?

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Hi Fred, yah I think that would be fine, or just feel free to reduce the fish sauce in the recipe.

  • Atul

    5 months ago

    My wife doesn’t like flavor of fish. Is there a substitute for fish sauce.

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Hey Atul, instead of fish sauce, salt would be the next best option. Enjoy!

  • Mimi Bartleson

    5 months ago

    I love Tom Yum and have tried many recipes that I’ve found online. I am allergic to shrimp so I must skip that, but then wonder how that impacts the flavor. The broth is my favorite part: Close-my-eyes delicious.

  • Michelle

    5 months ago

    I made both versions and we love them both!!! Thanks for sharing and giving me Thai dishes without going to a restaurant. It’s so fresh and clean!

  • Quan

    5 months ago

    Could I substitute the evaporated milk with sweet coconut milk?

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Hey Quan, that’s not typically done in Thailand, but yes, feel free to try that out, could be very good!

  • Leah

    5 months ago

    We made this a couple nights ago and it was AWESOME!!! Thanks so much!! I cooked up some rice noodle and served the clear version over them! So tasty!!

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Great to hear that Leah, glad you liked it. Sounds good with noodles as well!

  • Fahmi

    5 months ago

    Hi Mark, I tried your recipe today. It’s absolutely amazing !!!. Next time I would like to do the creamy one,. How do I make Thai Chilli Paste myself since it’s not easy to find the chilli paste here in KL, Malaysia…

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Hey Fahmi, thank you very much, glad you enjoyed this recipe. For the roasted chili paste, it’s mostly dried chilies, shallots, garlic, and sugar I think, all roasted down. I’m not totally sure how to make it, but I will try to make a recipe in the future. Thanks!

      • Fahmi

        5 months ago

        Thanks mark for the reply… I’m awed and inspired through your travel video in youtube around the globe… s Will definitely try another recipes that you published here. and looking forward for another great recipes..

        • Mark Wiens

          5 months ago

          You’re welcome, thank you Fahmi for all your support!

  • Terry

    6 months ago

    Mark,

    Tried this in a Thai restaurant , didn’t really know what I was eating but it was great.
    Do you eat everything that is put into the soup? i.e. lemon grass, kaffir leaves, galangal and all the veggies. (except garlic)
    Will let you know how it turns out.
    Was in Thailand in 1968, 1969, I am very envious. I am sure it has changed.

    • Mark Wiens

      6 months ago

      Hi Terry, great to hear you got to try some tom yum. Normally the lemongrass, galangal, and kaffir lime leaves, are just in the soup for the flavor, but not to be eaten. Enjoy!

      • Leah

        5 months ago

        I didn’t know those ingredients weren’t normally eaten. But, as the lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves were quite tough, I didn’t eat those. However, I did end up eating the galangal as it was quite soft and yummy, lol.

        • Mark Wiens

          5 months ago

          Hey Leah, it all depends on the age of the galangal — when it’s young it’s really good to eat, but the older galangal can be more tough. Glad you enjoyed it!

  • Doria

    6 months ago

    Awesome. Thank you for the video. I started with the clear soup. Creamy next time.

    • Mark Wiens

      6 months ago

      Great to hear that Doria, glad it turned out well!

  • Blink

    6 months ago

    Made it and ate it for the first time using this recipe. It was awesome and everyone in the family wants it again. One question, should you strain the broth from the lime leaves, lemon grass and galangal? Did I miss something there on my maiden voyage? We ate around it and it was still awesome. Thanks!!

    • Rebecca

      6 months ago

      Not at all! It’s always been in the soup I’ve gotten.

    • Rowan

      6 months ago

      I remove the large lime leafs and lemon grass stalks because i don’t like chewing on them. When i was in Thailand they added everything to the bowl. Just do what you prefer :)

  • Michelle M

    6 months ago

    Thank you for sharing this recipe! My first time making it and your directions allowed for easy adjustments. My hubby loved it and said it’s better than buying from our local Thai spot.

    • Mark Wiens

      6 months ago

      Hey Michelle, thank you for making this recipe and glad it turned out so well!

  • Wendy

    7 months ago

    My bf’s all-time favorite. We order this dish every time we’re at Thai. So I decided to make it myself. Super easy and quick!!!!! Turned out super duper yummy. I sub’d lime with lemon juice since I didnt have any limes, AMAZING still!!

    • Mark Wiens

      6 months ago

      Hey Wendy, that’s fantastic to hear, glad it turned out so well. And good tip about lemons!

  • claudia bullock

    7 months ago

    can’t wait to try this recipe, thank you so much!

  • lim kon hyen

    8 months ago

    how to buy thos item to malaysia

    • Mark Wiens

      8 months ago

      Hi Lim, I think most of the ingredients in this recipe should be available at local markets in Malaysia.

  • Fauzia

    8 months ago

    I have tom yum paste and dried herbs. How can I make tom yum goong soup with the paste and the dried herbs?

    • Mark Wiens

      8 months ago

      Hi Fauzia, tom yum paste is likely just a combination of chillies and galangal and lemongrass. But I’d recommend sticking with fresh herbs to make tom yum for a better taste.

  • Jelena

    8 months ago

    Was searching for a good authentic Tom Yum Soup recipe, when came across your website. Thank you for such a thorough explanation and step by step guide:)Super excited to try it out!!

    • Mark Wiens

      8 months ago

      Hey Jelena, thank you for reading this. You’re welcome, hope you enjoy it!

  • Erica

    8 months ago

    I like your 2 versions of Tom yam Goong. We eat a lot of Thai food n yours do look authentic so I am going to try your recipe!

    • Mark Wiens

      8 months ago

      Hi Erica, thank you very much, and great to hear you enjoy Thai food!

  • Grelyn

    8 months ago

    My husband love tom yum soup. I think he prefer the creamy version. I hope i can get that prick pao paste here in qatar but what if its not available here,do you have any substitute for that chili paste?

    • Mark Wiens

      8 months ago

      Hi Grelyn, good to hear from you, glad you and your husband enjoy prik pao. For substitute, you could either omit it, or you could make prik pao with dry chilies and shallots. Hope you enjoy it!

  • Kristina

    9 months ago

    Instead of evaporated milk use coconut milk. I mean if you’re allergic to coconuts please stick with the evaporated milk.

  • Shelly

    9 months ago

    10 Thai Chilis were way to hot. I can handle a lot of heat but it ruined the dish. The flavors were amazing I just I would of error on the side of not putting them all in.

    • Mark Wiens

      9 months ago

      Hi Shelly, sorry to hear that. Through my recipes, I’m aiming to provide a realistic amount of ingredients of how you’d find the dish in Thailand. But ingredients can be relative to location (like limes or chilies are not all the same strength depending on location or climate), and that’s why Thai food is all taste based, and made according to ones own taste.

  • Reem

    9 months ago

    Hi Mark,
    Thank you so much for posting this. I used to work as a flight attendant and once we stop at Bangkok i change and get my tom yum soup. I tried to to fined similar tasting tom yum soup but unfortunately I was never able to make it same as in Thailand. I have a question, can I use coconut milk or cream? If so do I just add it or replace the evaporated milk? And the lemon kiffar leaves what if I can’t find any what else can I use. Thank you so much

    • Mark Wiens

      9 months ago

      Hi Reem, awesome to hear from you, glad you used to stop in Bangkok and go straight to tom yum! Normally in Thailand coconut milk is not used in tom yum, but it’s used in tom kha. But you could try coconut milk if you’d like, and yes just replace it. For kaffir lime leaves, you could add just a squeeze of lime.

      • Maribel Nyunt

        7 months ago

        Hi mark wiens thank you so much I’ve read your email I’d like Thai cuisine really most specially their salads and this Tom yum soup Tom ga gai too

        • Mark Wiens

          6 months ago

          Thank you very much Maribel, great to hear that!

  • Lerushka

    9 months ago

    I like the clear version, though if I order it at a restaurant here (in South Africa) I always have to explain beforehand as they normally make the creamier version which probably caters for the western palate more.

  • Rodel

    10 months ago

    I tried your tom yum recipe (the creamy one) and a little less of chili, my wife and children love it!!

    Thank you and all the best!

  • Garry Lovell & Rhonda Watts

    10 months ago

    Hi :)
    I’ve had Tom Yum Goong Nam Sai a number of times and I have never had it without Tamarind. Your recipe doesn’t even mention it. I have many Asian friends who make it and all use it. I will certainly try yours but I can’t imagine it without tamarind – Go figure.
    Regards
    Garry

  • T Pen

    11 months ago

    After living in Thailand, (Chiang Mai) for the past 2 years I usually have to look up the food my girlfriend cooks on your site, just so I have an idea what I’m eating. Tom Yum Goong is one of my favorites. Of course I really like it with equal amounts of squid and Shrimp. Great recipe!

  • kripalu

    11 months ago

    I love watching all your receipes they are clear simple and very tasty.
    I love to cook, i am french most of my cooking is french cuisine.
    I am starting to learn step by step Thai cuisine and I really love it.
    My dream is to meet you mark in december when i will be in Thailand.

  • Alex Leong

    11 months ago

    Thanks for your recipe and TOM YAM is the best!!!!!

  • Anna

    11 months ago

    I just tried to make this tom yum goong nam sai and it was excellent! Also, surprised that its not complicated. Thanks for sharing your recipe! This is my 2nd recipe from this site. The first was the steamed fish in lime and chili sauce. Both were soo good!!!

  • Shalina

    1 year ago

    It was simply amazing! Has always been one of my favorite dishes when eating at a Thai restaurant. My darling was sick and made it for him. He lovedddd it! Thank you for sharing!,

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Shalina, great to hear you love tom yum goong, and glad it turned out so well!

  • Worker

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark,
    Thanks a lot for your delicious recipes and your great job.
    You are my Thai food guru … ;)

  • BB

    1 year ago

    Tried making the clear version of the soup couple of days ago. Preparing the creamy version today. I am never going to a Thai restaurant in North America again for this soup. I love my very own Thai kitchen & your recipe.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey BB, haha, that’s awesome, glad you enjoy it!

  • Claire

    1 year ago

    Hey Mark

    I was so happy to have found all these ingredients today. I have been searching for a while :) the recipe is fantastic! Thanks so much for sharing!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Claire, great to hear that, enjoy the cooking!

  • Gary

    1 year ago

    Looks good, but palm sugar for authenticity. Not white or brown!

  • mali

    1 year ago

    Thank you for posting and sharing the recipe. Great flavors for hot and sour soup. My Lao mother is a wonderful cook, but not the best teacher for when you are learning to cook for yourself.

  • Christine

    1 year ago

    Mark. I just made and ate this. It’s perfect. Thanks!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Awesome to hear that Christine, glad you enjoyed it!

  • Stuart

    1 year ago

    Your idea of leaving the heads and tails on the shrimps but taking the shell off the bodies is a masterstroke, because the shells will lend flavour to the soup, won’t they, but without making them awkward to eat

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Stuart, thank you very much, I can’t take credit for that idea… it’s done like this all over Thailand – but I agree, it’s a great way to cook shrimp!

  • KOCHY

    1 year ago

    HI MARK, I EAT TOM YUM SOUP CHICKEN IN MBK BANGKOK ONE WEEK AGO, I CANT FORGET THE TEST OF THIS SOUP. ITS WAS THE MOST APPETIZING SOUP I EAT . I WILL BE VERY GLAD TO GET THE RECIPE OF TOM YUM SOUP CHICKEN.
    THANK YOU MARK.

  • KOCHY

    1 year ago

    HI MARK, I EAT TOM YUM SOUP CHICKEN IN MBK BANGKOK ONE WEEK AGO, I CANT FORGET THE TEST OF THIS SOUP. ITS WAS THE MOST APPETIZING SOUP I EAT . I WILL BE VERY GLAD TO GET THE RECIPE OF TOM YUM SOUP CHIKEN.
    THANK YOU MARK.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Kochy, good to hear from you, glad you enjoyed tom yum so much. For chicken, just substitute the shrimp for chicken, and I think you can add the chicken right as you start boiling the soup. Enjoy!

  • Patricia

    1 year ago

    Do you add salt? I didn’t see it in the recipe. Please let me know.

    • Stuart

      1 year ago

      There’s no need to add salt, as saltiness comes from the fish sauce.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Patricia, often for tom yum it’s fish sauce that makes the soup salty, but you could add some salt if needed. Enjoy!

  • Konstantine

    1 year ago

    First time in my life I tried myself in cooking Tom Yum stop, and surprisingly from the first try at was so delicious and so easy to make! Thank you very much for recipe, I will definitely cook it again and again and again! :)

  • Oddy

    1 year ago

    I did the Tom Yum Goong Nam Khon the other day (though I toned down the heat a little bit, my family couldn’t really take too much of it), and my God, it tasted amazing! For a while I imagined myself being good enough to cook a proper Tom Yum soup at a local Thai restaurant, haha!

    It is surprisingly simple to prepare, with end results that definitely exceeded my initial expectations of it (well, it was easy to make, I thought I’ll have to go through kitchen’s hell to get this done decently).

    Thank you so much for the recipes! Definitely will come back to refer to it again and make another in a bigger bowl!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Oddy, really happy to hear your tom yum goong turned out so well, thanks!

  • Sinee Yoobamrung

    1 year ago

    You aren’t farang you are thai , Your Videos are amazing.

  • Jade

    1 year ago

    This looks amazing! Can’t wait to try it !!

  • Anastasia

    1 year ago

    Great recepy ! Excellent combination of all ingredients!! Just the way I had tested authentic Tom Yum inThailand couple years ago
    Thank you !

    • Anastasia

      1 year ago

      Oh! And absolutely five stars!
      Truly Thai style
      ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Anastasia, thank you very much, glad you enjoyed it!

  • chris

    1 year ago

    thanks so much for the recipe! you make it easy!

  • Dave McClymont

    1 year ago

    I would like to see some kind of heat scale attached to each recipe, say from one to ten like Resturants use. This would help with people like me that like some heat but don’t want to burn our lips off.
    Love your recipes and video’s keep up the good work.
    Dave

  • Brougham

    1 year ago

    Video was very easy to follow and understand. Prefer tum yum with reddish color, but without the milk. So, i will add the paste, but not the milk. Can’t wait to get home to try it out. We drive all the way to

    Arlington, MA ( from CT) for some good tum yum. Thanks again!

  • karen

    1 year ago

    OMG…first time making this. It’s so amazingly good! Thanks Mark!!!

  • Tara_is_a_G

    1 year ago

    Mark-Do i have to use the onions,mushrooms, and tomatoes to make this? I just really love the broth thats all!! =]=]=]

    and I love all your videos I hope I can cook like you one day!! Take care and cheers

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Tara, you can choose how you want, and if you don’t want to include that, that’s fine. Hope you enjoy it!

  • Jason

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark, I haven’t made this yet (next week!) but I have a question. I just got some Tom Yum soup from a local authentic Thai place. The veggies (broccoli, carrot, onion) were all very crispy, as though they were stir-fried then tossed into the soup at the end. Is this a variation you’ve seen? I definitely liked the texture a lot and the soup was delicious.

  • Risa

    2 years ago

    I just want to let you know that you are my favorite human being on this planet. I LOVE Thai food and you have made it so simple with detailed ingredients that I’m now able to try on my own!! 1,000 thanks you’s for your amazing website!!!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hah, thank you very much Risa, really appreciate your kind comment, and glad you love Thai food!!

  • Erfan

    2 years ago

    What’s up Mark! I just went to Thailand a couple of weeks ago and your videos helped me alot during my stay. And yes tom yum is the first food i ate, and you’re right! It really is one of the best soup in the world. Now it’s time to make my own. Thanks a lot dude.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Erfan, great to hear from you, glad you had a nice trip to Thailand and enjoyed the food. Glad you love tom yum!

  • S C Huang

    2 years ago

    Thanks for sharing the recipe, Mark. I tried out your recipe and my whole family love the result. Real tasty Tom Yum, ok.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Great to hear it turned out so well, thank you for sharing!

  • Dave

    2 years ago

    Made a a combination of this and another recipe tonight – was absolutely delicious. I crushed the garlic, used half a tin of italian roma tomatoes – it was very authentic, I’ve been to Thailand many times, thanks Mark really good website it was very helpful. My family raved about it !
    Dave, Sydney Australia

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Dave, nice to hear from you, thank you for sharing. Glad it turned out so well, and greetings to your family as well!

  • Sunitha

    2 years ago

    Thank you,will love to hear from you and pmreference is only vegetarian no meat.would love to learn more of this cooking

  • Sunitha

    2 years ago

    Thank you,will love to hear from you and preference is only vegetarian no meat.

  • Rich

    2 years ago

    Great taste but the lemon grass was really tough and chewy and stringy. Next time I will leave it whole and take it out before serving. I would also slice the garlic next time too. They are a bit much whole!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Rich, sorry about that, I should have mentioned in the recipe that the lemongrass and galangal are not typically eaten, but they are just used as aromatics for the soup broth. Good idea to just leave them at the bottom of the pot and just let me rest there releasing all their flavor. Sounds good!

  • Ivan Pinto

    2 years ago

    kindly send me the recipe for tom yum soup seafood

  • Mohamed Faris

    2 years ago

    Tom Yum gong nam sai is the best soap ever. Thanks for your perfect recipe and excellent video

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Mohamed, you’re welcome, glad you love tom yum goong as well.

  • Dan

    2 years ago

    Easily my favourite Thai dish. So easy to make too. I usually make enough for two people. Can you just reduce the quantity of ingredients for a smaller batch? I’m guessing this isn’t the sort of soup you could freeze or store in the fridge over night? I always make a small amount so never really needed to and I can’t stand the jarred pastes.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Dan, glad to hear you enjoy tom yum as well. Yes, you could reduce the ingredients, that would work fine. It really does taste best to make a fresh batch, but if you’re pressed for time, making a bigger batch an eating it for a few days does work alright. Enjoy!

      • Dan

        2 years ago

        Thanks pal. Made some last night with the ingredients reduced. Worked okay. I usually make it clear with chicken so went cloudy and it tasted so good I’m doing it again tonight with prawns. Love Thailand food. Got a freezer full of pastes and had massaman curry this week. So full of flavour. :)

        • Mark Wiens

          2 years ago

          Thanks for sharing Dan, glad it turned out well. Nicely done with the massaman curry as well!

  • Robin

    2 years ago

    This was easy and fantastic. I found all the ingredients and my local thai grocery. I loved that the ingredients could be roughly chopped and added. I used cooked shrimp so I thawed it separately and added it for the last 5-10 minutes of cooking on low. For Americans who still like it spicy, I used only 5 chillis and deseeded them and it was still the right amount of heat.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Robin, happy to hear you love tom yum and enjoyed this recipe, and thank you for your extra tips, sounds great!

  • Rajneel Kumar

    2 years ago

    wonderful, excellent, thanks for the recipe

  • Peter

    2 years ago

    Another great recipe, thank you! Your larb recipe is a staple at my house. This soup will now be in regular rotation this fall.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Great to hear you enjoyed it Peter, thank you!

  • tom

    2 years ago

    really great!!!! followed your recipe and was amazing thanks so much!!!!

  • chris

    2 years ago

    This is really good. Thank you!

  • Mark Haeger

    2 years ago

    My wife, who is Thai, makes the best Tom Yum with almost the identical recipe (I prefer the clear soup). My favorite is using pork ribs (cut about 11/2″-2″) instead of shrimp. The soup need to simmer a while to make the ribs fall-off-the-bone tender but they are delicious. She calls it Tom Yum Seecron(sp) Moo

    • Subur

      2 years ago

      Hi Mark,
      I tried the recipe and it was excellent. I live in New Zealand and I am lucky enough to have kaffir lime leaves and lemon grass in the garden. My family loves the soup I made. I use 4 limes and only 3 chillies. I also added a tablespoon of instant paste just for flavoring.
      The only problem was my husband spent some time to pick out the lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves and the galangal when eating them. I think I will have to strained them next time, but I am absolutely making them again and again.
      Thank you for sharing the recipe.

      • Mark Wiens

        2 years ago

        Hey Subur, I’m happy to hear your tom yum turned out so well, glad you enjoyed it. Typically in Thailand the lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, and galangal all just sit at the bottom of the bowl of soup – maybe just to keep the aroma, and so you know they are within the soup – and they are just eaten around without being eaten. But straining them out would work well also. Thank you again for sharing, and keep cooking Thai food!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Mark, great to hear from you, glad you love tom yum as well, and with pork ribs that sounds delicious!

  • Gayathiri

    2 years ago

    Dear Mark,

    I loved your delightful video on making tom yum! Trust me, nothing hits the spot better than a hot bowl of soup during the cold Tasmanian winter here. Last week, on the spur of the moment I decided to throw in some mussels and two blue swimmer crabs into the soup. My husband loved it!

    A problem I have faced on and off when making tom yum is that the soup tasted a little too fishy for my liking (despite using no more than two tablespoons of fish sauce). I wonder if there is a way to attenuate this odour? Maybe I’m not using enough kaffir lime leaves/lemongrass?

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Gayathiri,

      Thank yo for watching, glad you like to cook Thai food as well. I think it might be due to using the amount of lemongrass and galangal. And also make sure you add the lime juice at the end of cooking and make sure it’s sour enough – I think that will combat the fishiness of the fish sauce.

      It could also be the brand of fish sauce you’re using, some taste fishier. Usually in Thailand we use Tiparos brand, which to me is usually quite smooth. You could alternatively add just 1 spoon of fish sauce and then use salt.

      Hope this helps, let me know how it goes.

  • Talal

    2 years ago

    I tried your recipe and it was great! just like the restaurant.

    I played with it however by only using 5 limes and 3 chillis. I also like to add the nam prik pao even to the clear soup to get those little red oil bubbles on top and to get the extra flavor.

    A note to other readers: I had tried many times before to make Tom Yum Soup without having access to keffir lime leaves and galangal. Finally, after much searching I was able to find some where I live, and I have to say that it is not worth making if you don’t have these ingredients. You may be able to switch out ginger for galangal, but without keffir leaves just don’t waste your time. It won’t be Tom Yum.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Talal, great to hear from you, glad you made tom yum and you enjoyed it! Also, thank you for the tip for other readers.

  • Shayne

    2 years ago

    I like Tom Yum Soup and would love to make it at home.. problem is I can’t make it with shrimp or fish due to family food allergies.. Can this be made with chicken, beef or pork? and would it have the same rich flavor and depth.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Shayne, good to hear from you and that you like tom yum. Yes, tom yum is great with chicken, and I’ve even had it in Thailand a few times with beef. Give it a try!

  • Lawrence J. Viles

    2 years ago

    Will try the soup. After I find the nam prik pao. Thanks again Mark

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Sounds good Lawrence, let me know how it goes!

  • Jayantha

    2 years ago

    Dear Mark,
    Recently I was holidaying in Singapore with my family. I had Tom Yum a few times and got addicted. Just went through the net and found your recipe. Came back to Srilanka which Is my native place and tried your excellent instructions. Trust me, it came out so well even my family did not believe me that I did it.
    Thanks a million for your comprehensive vedio presentation, we now enjoy real Tom yum.
    I am a senior Cancer Specialist doctor in Sri Lanka. Would take this opportunity to invite you to my country for a vist. Will look after you with no fuss.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Jayantha, haha, thank you so much for sharing your story! Glad you love tom yum as well. I visited Sri Lanka about 4 years ago, and it still remains one of the top countries I’ve ever visited. But I’d love to come back again, I will let you know, thank you for the invitation. Thank you again and keep cooking Thai food!

  • Charles44

    2 years ago

    Thank you for this recipe I love Tom Yum soup so much it is one of my favorites next to Basil Beef with white rice…:)

  • Paul

    2 years ago

    Great website ,all the information i need in simple directions..thanks for your effort. I’ll be trying every recipe you’ve posted. We’re lucky to have amazing fresh produce to use where I live (except galangal) which is a little harder to find, so it’s off to the kitchen for me. I would love to buy a printed copy of “Eating Thai food guide” if you ever start printing them on paper. Thanks

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Paul, thank you very much, glad you love to cook as well, and that you can get many of the ingredients. I’ll let you know if I ever had the ebook printed. Thanks again!

  • Kid

    2 years ago

    After it’s cooked and ready to eat, can I remove the lemongrass, galangal and
    kaffir in the broth or leave them there?

    I thought of making a bigger batch of the soup to use as an all-purpose stock as
    the perfume is really respectable and it would make a change from veggie/chicken/beef stock.
    I thought of using it in a risotto.

    What say you?

    Thanks!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Kid, thanks for stopping by. Yes, you can remove those herbs if you like. Normally they would just sit at the bottom of the bowl, on not be eaten, but you can remove them all the same. I think that’s a great idea, enjoy!

  • sin

    2 years ago

    Sorry I am not English native speaker, I just find hilarious the word goong, i tried every way to pronounce it and it doesn’t rhyme correct to me, may be my English no good. My suggestion is try the real word KUNG it might sound right. Thats what is used in Thailand. My apologies if I have offended you or any reader.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Sin, no problem, thank you for the suggestion. The reason I spell it goong is because “kung” is ambiguous, it could be pronounced “koong” or “kung, as in sung.” So I spell it “goong” for the long ooo sound. But that’s one of the biggest issues for me translating Thai into English, there’s no standard.

  • Jesse

    2 years ago

    Excellent recipe. Made it as shown except only used about one lime total. I also cut the heads of the prawns and let those cook early on. Then took them out near the end and added the tails so they didn’t over cook.

    Enjoyed it both clear and with the condensed milk/chilli oil. There I found even a single tablespoon of the condensed milk was enough as it got too creamy otherwise.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Jesse, glad to hear you enjoyed this recipe. Thank you for sharing your extra tips!

  • Jessie

    2 years ago

    This recipe is to die for. I made it tonight and it was soooooo good. I made the clear version minus the chillies because of the kids and found 4 limes was enough and added more sugar and fish sauce. Tasted just like at the restaurants. It’s definitely a keeper! Thanks Mark, loving your recipes!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Jessie, fantastic, I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed this tom yum goong!

  • Shane

    2 years ago

    Mark,

    Just love your site(s) especially the cooking one. I am going to attempt the a few – especially the soups as they look pretty easy and I just love Thai soup.

    The best part of your cooking videos (too me) is when you try the food…. it’s like you’re eating your first bite of food ever…..(really great expressions).

    As one of the other commenters mentioned you keep making them and will keep watching them:-)

    If you get to San Francisco please look me up:-) I would love to give you the local’s tour of SF.

    Thanks again for the awesome site….

    Shane

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Shane, thank you very much for your kind words, glad you love cooking Thai food as well! Sounds great, if I make it to SF will let you know. Thanks again!

  • Nomnoms

    2 years ago

    What type of chillies are thai chillies?

  • Kang

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    Thank you for the website sharing the recipes! I made your tom yum goong nam khon recipe tonight and it was amazing. Growing up I’m used to the nam khon version so it was very exciting for me to finally making it myself :) This is the flavour I fondly remember.

    You mentioned on your post that this isn’t the “fancy” type – I wasn’t aware of the other type and wondering what you meant by that.

    I also saw two other Tom Yum recipes on your website but have chosen this one. I think the ingredients are very similar – do you have any preference?

    Thanks!
    Kang

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Kang, great to hear from you, thank you very much – glad you enjoyed this recipe and the tom yum. As for fancy type, I just intended that to mean that this version is the typical style you’ll find at street food and local restaurants in Thailand – not at sit down restaurants where they may use more expensive ingredients like a mixture of seafood, and serve it in a fire pot.

      This one is more updated than the other versions, and this is my preference. However, I went to a restaurant in Ayutthaya a few months ago, where I got to eat a traditional style of tom yum, that was incredible, so I’m hoping to make the recipe for that soon too.

      Thanks,
      Mark

  • Glenn S

    2 years ago

    Thank you for the recipe Mark! This came out great! You are on the nose when you say to taste test and adjust accordingly. For my next batch (no doubt there will be many) I will make a few changes. The Lemongrass I got in here in Vegas where huge, so I’ll drop to 2 or 3. I also tossed in a few Thai Eggplant I chopped up and they came out great. Since my roommate doesn’t like mushrooms, do you have any other vegetable suggestions to substitute for them?

    Thank you again for posting this. I’ll be trying several more of your recipes in the near future.

    Glenn

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Glenn, thank you very much, glad you enjoyed this. And yes, definitely a major part of cooking Thai food is taste-testing and balancing out all the flavors and ingredients. As for mushrooms, hmm, actually eggplant is a great idea, and I think you could really substitute anything of your liking – maybe cauliflower or zucchini, or just add more tomatoes and white onions. Happy cooking!

  • Sonya

    2 years ago

    I just tried this recipe and it is exactly the same flavor as the Tom Yum we get in our local Thai restaurant. For our personal taste, next time I would cut down the chillis to 6 instead of 10, and I used 1 regular size white onion, which I would cut down to 1/2. I used thin sliced chicken breast and shrimp as the meat and also added scallions with the cilantro at the end. I didn’t see this in the instructions, but before adding the meat, I strained out the lemongrass, lime leaves, chillis, galangal and garlic. I made the clear Tom Yum soup.
    I’m excited that I can finally make this at home, and so is my boyfriend! Thank you!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Sonya, this is awesome news, thank you for sharing, and so glad that you enjoyed this recipe. Also, I appreciate your tips and suggestions. Keep enjoying Thai food!

  • Mike

    2 years ago

    Mark, well what can I say? One word: WOW! I’ve been looking for an authentic Tom Yum recipe for ages and I need look no further! This was fantastic. Thanks.

    I need to work on the effect of varying the lime juice, fish sauce and sugar. Practice makes perfect I guess.

    I’m struggling to get galangal here in the UK so my dish lacked that this time. I’ll have to widen my search to ensure I source a supply.

    Can you recommend the next recipe I should have a crack at – we love chillis and chicken if that helps!

    Thanks again.

    Mike

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Mike, great to hear from you, and I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed this tom yum recipe! As for the next recipe, have you made pad kra pao (stir fried holy basil) yet: http://www.eatingthaifood.com/2014/01/thai-basil-chicken-recipe-pad-kra-pao-gai/ It’s one of the standard Thai dishes, spicy with chilies, and in this case made with chicken, but any meat of your choice. I think you’ll love it! Thanks again and hope you can find some galangal.

  • Fannie

    3 years ago

    I tried the tom yum goong nam sai yesterday…really yummy..kept sneaking into kitchen in middle of night to sip a ‘spoonFULL’ even I already had 2 big bowl for dinner! Love it! Love it! Love it! Thanks for sharing your recipe :)

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Haha, thanks for sharing Fannie, glad you enjoyed it!

  • Clara

    3 years ago

    Thanks for the recipe. I will have to find the Thai ingredients at a shop near me, then I am looking forward to making the soup. I prefer the clear broth. There is nothing like Tom Yum soup when you are feeling sick – spicy, sour and soothing.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Clara, you’re welcome, hope you enjoy it. Yes, I agree, it’s an amazing soup when you need a boost of herbs and flavor.

  • riyana

    3 years ago

    I have been trying to make tom yam soup and it always turns out into a tomato soup. Your recipe is a keeper. I am sure to impress my husband with these. It works like a charm. Smells good. Looks perfect. Taste like magic. Thank you for sharing this recipe. I wish I can share a picture of my cooking. So excited! Thank you!

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Wow, that’s great news to hear Riyana, thank you very much for sharing, and glad that you enjoy this tom yum recipe. Happy cooking!

  • Ian Ord – Where Sidewalks End

    3 years ago

    Amazing recipe!! I love it :) This is by far one of my most favourite dishes!! Do you know, by chance, the ingredients for the ‘other’ street style Tom Yum as well? when I order Kweh Diao Sen Lek Tom Yum, they seem to have a red paste that they add to the regular clear soup – it’s aroi mak mak (very delicious) and I’d love to be able to replicate that at home too. You can never enough soup recipes for one kitchen :)

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Ian, thank you very much, glad you love tom yum as well. As for the red paste, it’s probably “prik pao”? Does it come out of a can? And taste kind of sweet and smoky, and a little oily? That’s usually what they add I think.

  • James

    3 years ago

    I’ve been wanting to have a go at making Tom Yum for sometime now. Looked through quite a few recipes and decided to give you’re one a try. It turned out amazing!

    Thanks for posting this.

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      That’s amazing to hear James, thank you for giving my recipe a try and glad you enjoyed it.

  • Neil Mitchell

    3 years ago

    Thank you for the great Tom Yum piece Mark, it was excellent and very informative. This is one of my favorite soups, and I try to order it up whenever I can. If you are ever in Calgary, Canada, look me up and I’ll take you to the “Spicy Hut” restaurant for some chow and we can stuff our faces till the cows come home. I’m sure the head chef there is Thai, although the menu is a fusion of Thai and Szechuan. The Tom Yum at this place is absolutely and brutally excellent, sporting a satisfying spicy sourness, the bowl full of all kinds of lumber from pieces of lemongrass and galangal, and chocked full with tomato, mushrooms, and prawns. It is spicy, lime juicy, salty, savoury and incredibly fragrant all at the same time. When I take a big whiff of it after it arrives at the table I almost hack my brains out from it’s intriguingly spicy and complex fragrance. I’m not sure if it’s as good as the Tom Yum you’ve been eating, but it’s certainly quality fare for my neck of the woods and I somehow know you would like it a lot. Excellent article Mark, I really enjoyed it. Keep up the great work, your videos and recipes are nothing short of awesome. As a matter of fact they are “VOONDERBAR”. I’ll make you a deal….You keep making them, I’ll keep watching them!!

    Regards,
    Neil

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Neil, very cool to hear from you. That’s one of the best descriptions of tom yum I think I’ve ever heard – sounds amazing – and I’m sure I would enjoy it as much as you do. I will definitely let you know if I come to visit Calgary in the future. Thank you again, I’ll try to get more recipes out soon.

      Thanks,
      Mark

  • noodle

    3 years ago

    I love this soup. I brought home one of those stainless pots with place for a burner underneath – are those just for serving the soup at the table?

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Noodle, yes those fire pots are not for cooking, just for serving at the table and keeping the soup hot.

  • Kitti

    3 years ago

    You can still make Tom Yum with real coconut milk too.

    and I heard some people even further by make Tom Yum with wipcream.

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Thank you Kitti, haha whipped cream, might have to try that!

  • Maria Falvey

    3 years ago

    Tom-yum is incredible. Complex flavors that meld into something so comforting – truly is Yum!

  • Ashley

    3 years ago

    Thanks for the recipe! Tom Yum Soup is my absolute favourite!

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      You’re welcome Ashley, glad you love it also.

      • Renata

        2 years ago

        Hi Mark ,
        since I was in thailend in 2006 I have been addected to Tom YUM soup , but never had good recepie like that , I cant wait to cook it and try your recepie ! aaaaaaaaa

        Thank you , thank you , thank you so much :)
        Renata

        • Mark Wiens

          2 years ago

          Hey Renata, very cool to hear that, glad you love tom yum as well. Let me know how it goes!