Fried rice is a very typical Thai street food, available at every restaurant that serves stir fried dishes throughout the Thailand.

In this Thai fried rice recipe with shrimp, you’ll learn how to make a delicious plate of fried rice just like you’d find it in Thailand.

Let’s get cooking!

Thai fried rice
Authentic Thai fried rice recipe

Thai fried rice (khao pad ข้าวผัด)

Really quickly before we begin with this fried rice recipe, let’s go over a few details.

In Thailand, fried rice along with basil chicken (or other variations), are dishes that nearly every stir fry restaurant serves, especially common at street food stalls.

You can order Thai fried rice with your choice of meat, but one of my personal favorite versions is known in Thai as khao pad goong (ข้าวผัดกุ้ง), or fried rice with shrimp.

The reason I like it so much, because if you peel the shrimp, but leave the head on, so the oily goodness from the head of the shrimp acts like a sauce to coat the rice in red buttery shrimp flavor – it’s amazing (I’ll show you how in this recipe).

That being said, you can make this Thai fried rice recipe with shrimp or any other meat or protein you like.

Thai fried rice recipe
Some of the ingredients you’ll need for this recipe

Ingredients you’ll need

Note: If you want to get straight to the recipes details, scroll down to the video and recipe box below. But keep reading here, for a more in-depth overview of Thai fried rice.

One of the things that really makes this fried rice Thai (from other types of fried rice from around the world), is that Thai fried rice is served with a wedge of lime on the side, and something known as prik nam pla (พริกน้ำปลา), which is a condiment of chillies and fish sauce to garnish the fried rice.

I’m going to make this Thai fried rice recipe using shrimp, egg, Chinese broccoli (kailan), garlic, onions, green onions, and rice.

how to make Thai fried rice
Shrimp gives amazing flavor to fried rice

Shrimp

The best way to approach the shrimp is to start with whole fresh shrimp.

Pinch off the head, and de-shell the body, but keep the tail on (for Thai style), and try to retain the shrimp oil from inside the head on top of the body. This is what will give you fried rice a wonderful red orange color, and a nice rich flavor.

One more think, I don’t normally devein small shrimp like this, but you can if you’d like.

Best kind of rice to use?

In Thailand, fragrant jasmine rice is the favorite.

When it comes to rice for fried rice, it’s best to actually use day-old rice. That way, the rice is a little dried so it doesn’t get mushy or clump together when you stir fry it.

However if you must use freshly steamed rice, just try to make sure your bowl of rice has cooled off and that it’s somewhat dried out before you get started.

If you try to fry your rice when it’s still sticky and moist, it will stick to the pan a lot easier, and it also won’t give you that nice dry fried rice that you’re going for.

Authentic Thai recipes
Fresh Thai bird chilies to chop up with fish sauce

Chilies and fish sauce (prik nam pla พริกน้ำปลา)

Along with the fried rice itself, the most essential component of this Thai fried rice recipe is a condiment known as prik nam pla (พริกน้ำปลา).

No matter what Thai street food restaurant you eat at, you’ll always find this delicious condiment on your table.

How to make Thai chilies with fish sauce
Prik nam pla (chilies and fish sauce พริกน้ำปลา)

Prik nam pla (chilies and fish sauce พริกน้ำปลา) is really nothing more than diced chilies mixed with fish sauce (here’s the one I typically use), and sometimes a squeeze of lime juice, and that’s it.

A little sprinkle of the fish sauce and some fresh chilies on top of your plate of fried rice, plus an extra squeeze of lime juice, take each bite of fried rice to the next level, and truly makes it Thai fried rice from any other type of fried rice.

Ok, now let’s get into the full recipe.

(If you can’t see the video, watch it on YouTube here: http://youtu.be/mV3m2svj3XE)

Thai fried rice recipe with shrimp (ข้าวผัดกุ้ง)

Time: About 15 minutes as long as you have all the ingredients ready to go
Recipe size: This recipe is just for 1 single plate dish that serves 1 person
Cooking Utensils: I like to use a Chinese style wok, spatula
Flavors: Salty
Eat it with:  A sprinkle of black pepper, fish sauce and chilies, and a squeeze of fresh lime

Check out more of our Thai recipes by clicking here.

4.8 from 9 reviews
Thai Fried Rice Recipe with Shrimp (Khao Pad Goong ข้าวผัดกุ้ง)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Thai fried rice with shrimp (khao pad goong ข้าวผัดกุ้ง), is a very typical Thai street food dish, available at all stir fry restaurants. Though you can order the dish with your choice of meat, shrimp is the most popular option. What really makes Thai fried rice unique, is that it's served with a squeeze of lime on top to give it a nice sour tinge, and always accompanied by prik nam pla (พริกน้ำปลา), the Thai condiment of chilies and fish sauce. Enjoy this recipe for Thai fried rice! Watch the video of this recipe here.
Author:
Recipe type: Thai fried rice recipe
Cuisine: Thai
Serves: 1
Ingredients
Fried Rice with Shrimp (Khao Pad Goong ข้าวผัดกุ้ง)
  • 1.5 cups of cooked Jasmine rice cooled (or day old rice works well too) - Or just estimate about 1 normal bowl full
  • About 5 - 10 shrimp, head peeled, but tail on
  • ¼ of a big white onion (or ½ of a very small white onion, like I used)
  • 1 leaf of Chinese broccoli (or any crisp green leafy vegetable)
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tablespoon soy sauce
  • ½ tablespoon oyster sauce
  • Pinch of sugar (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon of oil for frying
Prik Nam Pla (Chilies in Fish Sauce พริกน้ำปลา)
  • 5 Thai chilies
  • 3 tablespoons of fish sauce
  • ½ of a lime
Instructions
Fried Rice
  1. If you’re using whole fresh shrimp like I did, first pinch off the head, and peel the outer shell of the shrimp, leaving only the tail on (that’s Thai style). You can also devein them if you’d like, but for small shrimp, to me it doesn’t really matter.
  2. Peel 2 cloves of garlic, and then just finely mince them
  3. Slice ¼ of a sweet white onion into medium sized strips
  4. Finely dice about 3 - 4 green onions
  5. Take just 1 leaf of Chinese broccoli (kai-lan), slice it in half first along the spine, and then slice it into 1 centimeter sized strips
  6. Turn on your stove to medium high, heat up your wok (or frying pan), and add about 1 tablespoon of oil
  7. Once your oil is hot, add the garlic first, and stir fry continuously for about 15 seconds or so, until it gets nice and fragrant
  8. Next, toss in your shrimp, and fry for about 30 seconds - your shrimp should start to turn pink and feel more firm
  9. Add in a little less than ½ of your rice first. This is going to soak up all those delicious shrimp juices and oils and keep your rice nice and dry. Stir fry for about 10 more seconds - This is a little known trick to make good rice, so it remains nice and dry
  10. Scoot all your rice to one side of the pan, and then crack in the egg into the empty side
  11. Whirl the egg up, let it cook for a few seconds, and then start to mix it up with the rice and shrimp
  12. Keep stir frying for about 20 seconds until the egg is fully cooked, and then add in the rest of your rice, and give it a quick stir
  13. Add ½ tablespoon of soy sauce, ½ tablespoon of oyster sauce, just a pinch of sugar (optional), and continue stir frying your rice, making sure all the sauce get mixed in
  14. Then add your chopped Chinese broccoli and onions, and stir fry for another 30 seconds until the vegetables wilt, but they can still be crisp and not fully cooked
  15. Lastly, toss in your green onions, stir it a few more seconds, and it’s ready
  16. Immediately dish your fried rice onto a plate
  17. Slice off a wedge of lime, and serve it on the plate next to the rice
  18. For the final touch, I like to sprinkle some freshly ground black pepper on top to give some extra flavor
Prik Nam Pla (Chilies in Fish Sauce)
  1. Add 3 tablespoons of fish sauce to a small bowl
  2. Slice about 5 Thai chilies (you can add more or less, up to you), and add them to the fish sauce
  3. Finally, I like it with a little squeeze of about ½ of a lime - but this is optional - and at many Thai restaurants it’s only fish sauce and chilies
  4. That’s is, give it a stir, and set it aside

Thai fried rice recipe
Hot and fresh, it’s one of the ultimate comfort foods

Another thing I like to do, before I start eating fried rice, is to sprinkle on some freshly ground black pepper. This just adds another lovely subtle flavor to the dish.

Then I like to dig into my bowl of chili and fish sauce (prik nam pla), and scoop up some of that delicious flavor and generously put it onto each bite.

And again, the reason the Thai fried rice comes out so orange in color, is due to the shrimp head oils.

If you use fresh shrimp, and they still have the head-on, you still peel off the head before cooking, but try to keep most of the inside of the head still connected – this will add that lovely shrimp oil to your fried rice, making it all the more delicious, and you’ll the orange color as well.

Thai fried rice recipe
Thai fried rice recipe

Conclusion

One of the best simple dishes to make with day old rice is fried rice, and it’s without a doubt a contender for the most comforting food in the world (at least I think so).

This authentic Thai fried rice recipe is similar to other versions of fried rice, but it has a few distinct variations, especially the fish sauce and chilies that you eat it with.

Give this recipe a try, and let me know it turns out!

Check out more of my Thai recipes here.



53 comments. I'd love to hear from you!

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  • Dave Wilson

    1 month ago

    Great recipe Mark.

  • Mack

    2 months ago

    Can’t figure how to print the receipt for Thai fried rice. Sounds good

  • Yan

    2 months ago

    That’s amazing!!!! Thanks a lot!!

  • Aleya

    3 months ago

    It looks just wonderful! I just wanted to say that my husband and I have been watching your videos for quite some time now! Even our kids watch! I thought it was pretty cool that you studied linguistics, my husband as well. He actually has been teaching English for a little while now. Great videos and blog, we hope to see more ! If you come back to New York we would love to have you over :)

  • Agnes Kallo

    3 months ago

    Absolutely stunning food. Super delicious. Mark your are a genius.

  • Ulyana

    4 months ago

    Wow, thanks, Iooks easy and delicious, will try that out!

  • Rach

    4 months ago

    Hello Mark! This recipe of yours was very delicious! I cooked it last night and my family loved it! Hope to see more and more of your recipes in the next days! Cheers!

  • Henry Bogdan

    4 months ago

    Can’t wait to try this. Thanks Mark !

  • ALEJANDRO PARRA

    5 months ago

    I just cooked the Fired rice following your instructions closely. The result was excellent! We have been in Thailand more than 20 times and love Thai food. Thank you for the recipe. Instead of chinesse broccoli leaf I used spinach with the same results. Hard to find chinesse broccoli in Mexico. Prik nam pla was made with mexican green chile. But soon I’ll make it with the real chilis, because I bring some chili seeds from Thailand and just planted to grow my own red chili.

    • Mark Wiens

      5 months ago

      Hey Alejandro, so glad to hear the fried rice turned out well! That’s awesome you brought some Thai chilies to Mexico!

  • Shaun

    6 months ago

    Some great tips there Mark. I like to make fried rice with tinned fish and I often use brown rice which is less sticky and more healthy.

    • Mark Wiens

      6 months ago

      Thank you so much Shaun, I agree with the brown rice, I like it too!

  • Valerie

    7 months ago

    Thanks for this recipe… I always shy away from making any fried rice as it gets soggy… Gonna try yours with a day old rice.
    I can’t get Chinese broccoli.. Can I use spinach instead?

    • Mark Wiens

      7 months ago

      Hi Valerie, you’re welcome, and thank you for reading. Hmmm, I think possibly spinach would make it a little too moist, but you could either omit it or can you get bok choy?

  • Stefie

    10 months ago

    Hey Mark, I just made this tonight and it taste amazing! It is easily became my fav meal. Thank you for sharing :)

    • Mark Wiens

      9 months ago

      Hey Stefie, awesome to hear you enjoyed this Thai fried rice. Thanks for sharing!

  • Jenny

    1 year ago

    This makes my mouth water! And bring back memories of 1 year in Bangkok!

  • Cheshirecat

    1 year ago

    Just got back from 2 months in Bangkok last Thursday (Mar 17/16) and miss the shrimp fried rice from Tesco Lotus food court at On Nut Skytrain stop. One stall made it badly and was inedible; the other did it perfectly like you did. Will make at home now in Vancouver.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Haha, awesome to hear that, hope you can make it at home now!

  • Kate Cricco

    1 year ago

    Found your website today after just having been on a cruise with a great waiter from Thailand. Made the shrimp dish tonight- used calamari and tilapia instead of shrimp, baby corn instead of spinach, jalapenos instead of thai peppers ( no access to the spinach or peppers), so darn good!!!! Thanks so much!! I’m thinking the fish sauce and lime, plus limited amount of soy sauce is what makes Thai food so much better than Chinese? Can’t wait to try your other recipes!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Kate, thank you very much for sharing, and great to hear your fried rice turned out so well. Thanks!

  • Jules

    1 year ago

    Dear Mark,

    love your work!
    little advice, in your ingredients list I miss the springonion.

    Grtz from a Holland Thai food lover

  • midge peppers

    2 years ago

    Do you have vegetarian recipes
    My husband is a vegetarian I am not

  • Sofia

    2 years ago

    Hello again Mark!
    I love fried rice and prik nam pla goes well with it (also on fried noodles). Don’t know where to post this request really, but is it possible to post some pictures of my childhood desserts/treats Foy thong and Thong yod? The last time I ate them was probably 12 years ago. I love them.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hi Sofia, thank you very much, glad you like prik nam pla so much as well. Yah, I will try to do some Thai desserts reviews. Thanks for the suggestion. Will you come back to visit Thailand soon?

      • Sofia

        2 years ago

        Hey Mark,
        Thanks for the reply. Not in the near future! But I am currently cooking and eating Thai food almost everyday for the past few weeks. Love your recipes. Well done.

        • Mark Wiens

          2 years ago

          Cool to hear that Sofia, keep up the cooking!

  • Marie

    2 years ago

    Hi mark , I was wondering in which step of making your khao pad goong do u add the prawn oil ( which is the orange juice in the head )
    I used it by just just using it as a marinate over the prawns when I wa peeling them, but it changed the texture when I stir fried them nice but soft and very string prawny taste (melt in the mouth )
    Otherwise ok but I want wow !
    Please reply
    Regards marie

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Marie, good to hear from you. For this recipe, normally the prawn oil (liver) is still within the prawn head, so you just add the shrimp as the same in this recipe, and if the shrimp have enough oil, when they cook, it will be released into the pan, and then coat the rice when you add it. Let me know if this works!

  • Joan wise

    3 years ago

    Hello mark! just made the Thai fried rice/Khao pad goong for lunch today it was delicious with a side of fish sauce and Thai chillies. Thumbs up! My kids love it.

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Great to hear that Joan, glad you all enjoyed it.

  • Patrick

    3 years ago

    Hey Mark,

    i love your Videos so much.

    I wanted to try this recipe, can i use my electic stove or do i need the fire? =)

    Thank you so much!

    Patrick

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Patrick, good to hear from you, thank you very much for watching my videos. Yes, you can use an electric stove. The main difference is that you can control the heat more quickly from a fire, but it should work fine with an electric stove too. Enjoy!

  • Sahr

    3 years ago

    In which numbered step did you add the chili and fish sauce?

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Sahr, do you mean the chili fish sauce mixture? That’s just used to garnish, when you’re eating it. Hope you enjoy this recipe.

  • Sasi Balasubramaniam

    3 years ago

    Mark, thanks so much for putting these recipes up. I have been cooking a few different dishes from a number of your recipes. You have made the cooking process really simple, and it taste amazingly great. Many people are fearful of cooking thai food due to the complexity, but you made the process easy – well done! Miss thailand, wish I could go back again soon.

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Sasi, thank you very much for your kind words, I really appreciate it. Glad that you’re enjoying the recipes. Hope you’re doing well, and hope you can come back to Thailand again soon.

  • Clifton Linton

    3 years ago

    Thanks Mark. I very much like your website and your insight into the Thai Street food world. Have been to Thailand once, can’t wait to go back again. Keep up the good work.

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Thank you Clifton, hope you can come to visit Thailand again in the future.

  • Greg

    3 years ago

    Hey Mark, I was wondering if you have ever made or published a recipe for banana blossom salad. I had it once at Rosa Being restaurant in Bangkok & it was amazing!
    Thanks. Really enjoy all your recipes!

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Greg, good to hear from you. No, have yet to make a recipe for that, but will write it down, and possibly in the future.

  • Susan goddard

    3 years ago

    Where can I get the Eat more… Tea shirt. And what is the cost

  • Trent @ Food Assault

    3 years ago

    Always a favourite Mark and love Goong. I still miss going to the markets and buying a kilo of banana prawns for 160 baht.

    Unfortunately it’s 3 times that price here in Sydney. Where’s your favourite market for great fresh and live seafood selections in Bangkok?

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Trent, yah it’s such a joy to go to the wet market and get some ingredients. I normally just go to my neighborhood market, or to Khlong Toei, but I’ve been to Mahachai a few times which is awesome – wish I lived next to that seafood market! Where did you used to go in Bangkok?

      • Trent @ Food Assault

        3 years ago

        Thanks Mark, I’ve heard that Khlong Toei is a great go-to for markets. I’ve not been in Bangkok, however Banzaan market in Phuket was our place to be for veggies, fruit and proteins.

        • Mark Wiens

          3 years ago

          Thanks Trent, will remember that if I go to Phuket!

  • Gabe

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark!

    Love your recipes/videos! Photos are beautiful. Just wanted to let you know that the Thai for Khao Pad Goong under the video actually says “Khai Jeow Muu Sap.” :)

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Thank you very much Gabe, and thanks for pointing that out – got it changed now!